Adele Cameron

Cameron2-PhotoLOWPhD student

Email: adele.cameron-8AT8-open.ac.uk

Profile

I am a NERC funded PhD student in my third year.  My research is focused in the field of palaeooceanography and geochemistry and I utilise a number of different proxies to try to understand how ocean circulation may have operated under the globally warm conditions of the early Eocene (around 50 million years ago).

In order to reconstruct ocean circulation patterns I use sediment samples obtained from the Integrated Ocean Drilling Programme (IODP) from a variety of oceanic sites particularly the Atlantic Ocean.  From these washed samples I pick fossilised fish teeth, chemically clean and dissolve them, then isolate a rare earth element (neodymium).  I measure the isotopic composition of the neodymium using a Neptune Multi-collector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (MC-ICPMS).

The neodymium preserved in these fossilised fish teeth records the deep ocean water composition of neodymium washing over the sites where the fish teeth were deposited and fossilised.  The neodymium in the oceanic waters is sourced from the weathering of continental rock material, and the age of the material being weathered imparts a different isotopic signal allowing us to map out and observe changes in sources of weathering in to the oceans.  Utilising this technique allows me to analyse where deep waters may have formed in the past.

I am also doing some trace element work in both fish teeth and foraminifera which also helps me determine the oceanic conditions when they were deposited and particle size analysis which helps to determine the speed of palaeocurrents in the oceans.

Qualifications

MEarthSci (with Hons) Geology, 1st class, University of Edinburgh

BSc (Hons) Pharmacy, University of Strathclyde

Supervisors

Dr Philip Sexton, Dr Pallavi Anand & Howie Scher (University of South Carolina)

Publications

Abstracts

  • Cameron, A., Sexton, P., Anand, P., Fehr., M, & Scher, H. The Neodymium isotopic signature of Northern Atlantic deep waters during the early Eocene ‘greenhouse’. 2014 Geochemistry Group Research in Progress Meeting, Geological Society of London.
  • Penman, D. E., Kirtland-Turner, S., Sexton, P.F., Cameron, A., Boulila, S., Norris, R., Zachos, J., Roehl, U., Westerhold, T.  2013. Direct evidence for CCD over-compensation in the aftermath of the PETM.  AGU, Fall meeting 2013, abstract #PP22A-05
  • Cameron, A., Sexton, P., Anand, P., Fehr, M., Scher., H.  2013.  Ocean Circulation during Eocene extreme ‘greenhouse’ climatic warmth.  Postgraduate Research in Marine and Earth Science (PRMES13), NOC, Southampton.
  • Cameron, A., Sexton, P., Anand, P, Scher, H.  2012. Ocean circulation changes during the early Eocene 'greenhouse'. How can Neodymium isotopes in fish teeth help? UK-IODP Student Conference, 2012, Chichely Hall, Newport Pagnell & UK-IODP conference, Oxford University.
  • Cameron, A., Sexton, P., Anand, P., Scher., H.  2011. Ocean circulation changes during the early Eocene 'greenhouse'. How can Neodymium isotopes in fish teeth help? Geochemistry Group Research in Progress Meeting, Geological Society of London.

Awards

  • Highly commended presentation: Geochemistry Group Research in Progress Meeting, Geological Society of London, 2014
  • ECORD Scholarship to attend the Urbino Summer School in paleoclimatology & climate modeling, 2013